rasasvada Baton Rouge
showslow:

Valerie Hegarty, Sinking Ship

showslow:

Valerie Hegarty, Sinking Ship

crossconnectmag:

Tyler Jacobson (born 1982) is an American science fiction & fantasy artist and illustrator whose work has been featured in publications by Wizards of the Coast, Simon & Schuster, Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, Men’s Journal, The Weekly Standard and Scientific American.

Jacobson is best known as a fantasy artist, due to his significant contributions of art to Magic:The Gatheringtrading card game cards, package art, and promotional materials, as well as character design and game art for Dungeons & Dragons. via

He is represented by Richard Solomon in New York City. 

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(Source: cocaineteas, via girl-undr-you)

crossconnectmag:

Maria Rubinke is the Danish artist works with the classic porcelain figure, where she allows the incomprehensible and chaotic in the human subconscious to rise to the surface. The pure white porcelain surface attracts the gaze of the viewer, but at the same time distorts our presuppositions when the small porcelain girls are slowly broken down and subjected to contrast-filled madness. They sink down and seem to drown in the thick mud of the bog and are fatally bitten by a snake. Like the Surrealists, Maria Rubinke thematizes the complexity of the human psyche and works in a formal idiom all her own.

Rubinke studied at the School of Glass and Ceramics on Bornholm in 2008. Later she has exhibited at Haugar Vestfold Museum of Art in Norway and the Civic Museum Bassano del Grappa in Italy, and most recently she has presented a comprehensive solo exhibition, Fragile, at the Vejle Art Museum in 2012.

                               :-)

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crossconnectmag:

Art or Photography ? High Fashion Fantasy from the great Patrizio Di Renzo

At the beginning of the nineties, Di Renzo leaves Italy to have first experiences in the field of fashion photography. Amongst others, he works in Istanbul for fashion magazines such as Harper’s Bazaar and Elle. In 2001, Di Renzo returns to Switzerland for a short time to work as an advertising and fashion photographer. A few years later, his work draws the attention of fashion designer Tsumori Chisato who commissions him for an international campaign as well as a store concept. During this period, Di Renzo – who in the meantime has moved to New York/Los Angeles – takes up work on his first book of photographs, „Portraits of Illusions“. The photo book tells short stories with pictures taken, amongst others, in Ireland, New York, and the Seychelles. The photos intentionally drift away from reality - Di Renzo’s motto being: Move away from Realism. The book is published by Assouline in 2006, with a preface by critic Gabriel Bauret. During this time, Di Renzo works with, amongst others, Devon Aoki, Chloë Sevigny, Natalia Vodianova, Dean&Dan (DSQUARED).

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nofreedomlove:

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

(via fxlawless)

johtoween:

he does the a-r-t-p-o-p hand thing omg…

(via girl-undr-you)